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Killen Falls (Boodgeragah Walk)

North Coast NSW

Tintenbar

KEY INFO

Distance (kms):

1 km

Time (hrs):

Allow 45 mins

Elevation gain (m):

30 m

Max. elevation (m):

69 m

Difficulty (Grade):

Moderate (Grade 3)

Route type:

Out-and-back

Traffic:

Heavy

Access:

2WD Sufficient

Click to see full image.

A short walk to a beautiful waterfall, surrounded by lush forest, with a viewing platform and ability to walk behind the curtain of the falls.

This heavily trafficked hike starts from a small car at the end of Killen Falls Road in Tintenbar. 


The track starts from the bottom of the car park, along a well-maintained gravel path, fenced on either side, through lush forest with the occasional wooden boardwalk section.


Follow Emigrant Creek downstream for just over 300m before arriving at the short side-track to the constructed viewing platform at the top of the falls.


Get a birds-eye view of the falls as they drop into the pool below, with the view upstream of the creek also quite picturesque. 


The track then descends to the base of the falls, becoming steeper and rougher. The track is rocky and there are a number of exposed tree roots, which make it very slippery in wet conditions. There is however, a handrail on either side of the track to assist.


From the bottom of the stepper section, turn left and head upstream to the base of the falls, via a short rock-hop, which again can be slippery in wet conditions.


The view from the base of the falls is beautiful, with the wide falls dropping into the pool and the curved rock face draped in foliage.


There is also the option to walk into the overhang behind the curtain of the falls.


This area contains one of the last standing remnants of the big scrub rainforest, which once covered the Northern Rivers region before foresters began clearing it to just one per cent of its original size. 


While it possible to swim at the falls, and many do, consider that the area is known for having variable water quality.


As with any natural swimming hole, exercise caution when entering the water, as there may be submerged rocks and other objects. In addition, help keep the fragile environment pristine by taking all rubbish with you and minimising the use of chemicals (such as sunscreen) if you are swimming. 


Track: The track to the viewing platform is relatively flat, however does have a number of bumps along the track that may make it unsuitable for wheelchairs (at least without assistance). The track to the base of the falls is short, but steep and rough, with rocks and exposed roots, and a final rock-hop to the base of the falls. The walk is well-signed and easy-to follow.


Difficulty: The track is short and suitable for all fitness levels, however the track to the base of the falls may be problematic for those with balance issues. 


Direction: This is an out-and back track that returns the way it came. 

getting there

This trail starts from a small car at the end of Killen Falls Road in Tintenbar, 2.25 hours drive south-east of Brisbane.


The car park is very small, with limited street parking, and is not suitable for large vehicles, such as caravans and motorhomes.

best time to go

The walk can be completed year-round.


The area is prone to flooding during or after rain, so be careful if visiting at these times and never proceed into flooded areas.

Click title on the map above to view larger map

in new window [on the Garmin website]

Remember, whenever venturing into the outdoors, practice the Leave No Trace principles and be considerate of others. This means: dispose of your waste properly, don't remove things or move things from their natural position and respect all wildlife. Also be sure to plan ahead and adequately prepare for any adventure. 

I respectfully acknowledge the Traditional Owners of the land on which all activities listed on this website are found, as well as Elders past, present and emerging. I strive to not promote sites where requests have been made for people not to explore due to the cultural significance of the site to Indigenous peoples, or note how to respectfully visit a site. If I have a promoted a site with cultural significance, please send me a message and let me know.   

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