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Mickey & Warrumbah Creek Gorge

Central Highlands

Carnarvon National Park

KEY INFO

Distance (kms):

4.7 kms

Time (hrs):

Allow 2 hrs

Elevation gain (m):

83 m

Max. elevation (m):

488 m

Difficulty (Grade):

Moderate (Grade 4)

Route type:

Out-and-back

Traffic:

Moderate

Access:

2WD Sufficient

Click to see full image.

Escape the crowds and explore two narrow gorges, full of lush ferns and mosses, outside of the main area of the park.

This moderately trafficked walk starts from the Mickey Creek car park, 2kms prior to the visitor area on Carnarvon Gorge Road.


A well-formed track meanders alongside Mickey Creek, with views of the dramatic sandstone cliffs nearby, crossing it via large stepping-stones.


At the one-kilometre mark, a side-track to Warrumbah Creek Gorge branches to the right. It is recommended to leave this for the return leg of the walk as it is the more spectacular of the two gorges.


Continuing straight to Mickey Creek Gorge, the formed track ends at the 1.25km mark. From here you can rock-hop up the gorge as far as you feel comfortable. 


About 300m into Mickey Creek Gorge, there is a narrow gorge to the right. This could be explored in dry conditions, otherwise a wade through 10m of stagnant knee-to-waist deep water is required to continue.


As you progress further into the gorge it gradually gets narrower, the boulders get larger, and the scrambling slightly more difficult. 


This continues for about 500m before the gorge has another pool and large boulders that represent a good turn-around point.


Warrumbah Creek Gorge is not to be missed on the return leg. Cross the creek again and follow the track. 


Shortly after, the formed track ends and you enter a beautiful and other-worldly gorge blanketed in ferns, moss, orchids and staghorns. You may even spot a shy swamp wallaby.


Cross the creek multiple times as you find the best route through the gorge, with the sandstone cliffs getting higher and more dramatic as you progress further, exploring the gorge for as far as you feel comfortable. 


This is the perfect walk for those who cannot make it to Boowinda Gorge, but who want that unique narrow gorge experience.


Track: The track leading to both gorges is a mostly flat, well-maintained graded path, with occasional steps. There are large stepping-stones at each of the creek crossings. The track is well-signed and easy to follow, however there are no signs advising where to turn around in either gorge.


Difficulty: The track is suitable for all fitness levels but does require good balance for the rock-hopping. The creek crossings have large stepping-stones which may be slippery. The creek is typically only very faint. Sturdy shoes with good grip and hiking poles are highly recommended.


Direction: This is an out-and-back track that returns the way it came. 

getting there

The trailhead is located at the Mickey Creek car park, 2kms prior to the Visitor Centre, on Carnarvon Gorge Road. It is 8.5 hours drive north-west of Brisbane, 7 hours drive west of Bundaberg and 3 hours north of Roma.


It is recommended to break up the drive to the park and consider the impact of fatigue on driving safety. Many of the roads leading to the park are rural roads prone to wildlife, especially at dawn and dusk.  


Parking is limited and can fill up during busy periods.

best time to go

The walk can be completed year-round. The area is prone to flooding after rain. Be sure to check the Queensland Parks website for updates regarding flooding and track closures.

Click title on the map above to view larger map

in new window [on the Garmin website]

Remember, whenever venturing into the outdoors, practice the Leave No Trace principles and be considerate of others. This means: dispose of your waste properly, don't remove things or move things from their natural position and respect all wildlife. Also be sure to plan ahead and adequately prepare for any adventure. 

I respectfully acknowledge the Traditional Owners of the land on which all activities listed on this website are found, as well as Elders past, present and emerging. I strive to not promote sites where requests have been made for people not to explore due to the cultural significance of the site to Indigenous peoples, or note how to respectfully visit a site. If I have a promoted a site with cultural significance, please send me a message and let me know.   

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